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John Henry Newman’s Second Journey to Rome: 1846-1847

by | Apr 29, 2021 | History, New and Noteworthy

Newman's Journey to Rome Map
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    Elizabeth Huddleston is Associate Editor for the Newman Studies Journal. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Music Education from the University of Georgia and a master’s degree in Theological Studies from the University of Dayton, and a doctorate in Theology also from the University of Dayton. Her dissertation is entitled, Divine Revelation as Rectrix Stella: The Evolution of Wilfrid Ward’s Doctrine of Divine Revelation, which was completed in 2019 under the direction of Dr. William L. Portier. Dr. Huddleston’s research interests include the reception of Newman’s doctrine of revelation in nineteenth- and twentieth-century theology, the relationship between music and theology, ecumenical and inter-faith conversations, and the intersection of dogmatic theology with Christian mysticism.

National Institute for Newman Studies

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